The saga of what would become Casablanca began as a play called Everybody Comes to Rick’s, by playwrights Murray Burnett and Joan Alison. Although the play was never producedWarner Bros. story editor Irene Diamond found the script during a trip to New York and convinced WB’s head of production Hal B. Wallis to buy the rights and studio chief Jack Warner loosened the Warner Bros. purse strings and paid more money than had ever been spent for an unproduced play. The twin-brother screenwriting team of Philip and Julius Epstein were brought in to adapt the story to the screen with Howard Koch also receiving a piece of the Academy Award the script garnered. 

The twin-brother screenwriting team of Julius and Philip Epstein at the time of Casablanca.
The twin-brother screenwriting team of Julius and Philip Epstein at the time of Casablanca.


Co-screenwriter Julian Epstein from the featurette, You Must Remember This: A Tribute to Casablanca

There was a lot of chaos in the second half of the picture because we were shooting and there was a stop-date on [Ingrid] Bergman and nobody knew what the ending was going to be. So in the front office [at the studio] there was a great deal of what can only be described as hysteria. During the hysteria about the ending, my brother Phil and I looked at each other and said, 'Round up the usual suspects' and we knew we had an ending.


Filming began in May of 1942, nearly six weeks later than originally scheduled, and director Michael Curtiz (who won the film's third Oscar for "Best Director") was forced to shoot the movie in sequence as the second half of the script had yet to be completed. This fact led the film's leading lady, Bergman, to continually ask her director and the writers which of the two men she would end up with at the conclusion of the film: Bogart or Paul Henreid.

In retrospect this unwritten mystery may have helped with the film's suspenseful love triangle that continues to rivet audiences as the players themselves were acting with no knowledge of what was to come. They were literally portraying their characters in the moment as the future had not yet been penned.
 

6 Classic Casablanca Quotes 

In 2005, the American Film Institute (AFI) included these six lines from Casablanca in their "100 Years…100 Movie Quotes" list. Interesting to note that no other film had more than three quotes included in the Top 100.

A look around the set of Rick's Cafe during filming in June of 1942.
A look around the set of Rick's Cafe during filming in June of 1942.
Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman and director Michael Curtiz going over the ongoing script on the set of Casablanca.
Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman and director Michael Curtiz going over the ongoing script on the set of Casablanca.
Director Michael Curtiz, star Ingrid Bergman and producer Hal B. Wallis on the set of Casablanca.
Director Michael Curtiz, star Ingrid Bergman and producer Hal B. Wallis on the set of Casablanca.
The Famous Final Scene

The famous final line of the film: “Louis, I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship” was actually written by producer Hal B. Wallis after filming had been completed. In fact, Bogart had to be brought back in to dub Wallis’ last minute addition over the last scene of Bogart and fellow Oscar nominee Claude Rains walking into the mist (pictured below). A little movie magic that has gone on to become one of Hollywood’s most memorable last words.

Bogart's famous last line was dubbed over this final scene.

Casablanca is readily available on Blu-ray and Digital.

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